Tomato nutrition facts

Tomato nutrition facts DEFAULT

7 Health Benefits of Tomatoes

In case you were wondering, a tomato is a technically a fruit, because it’s seed-bearing and develops from the ovary of a flowering plant. (Botanically speaking, vegetables consist of other plant parts, like roots, leaves, and stems.) But when it comes to nutrition, tomatoes —along with seedy cucumbers and zucchini—are categorized as vegetables. That's due in part to their lower carb and sugar contents: A medium tomato provides just 22 calories, and about 5 grams of total carb, with 3 as sugar and 1.5 as fiber. But this low-calorie, low-carb package is chock-full of nutrients, and has been linked to a variety of health benefits. Here are seven, along with some simple ways to incorporate more tomatoes into your everyday meals and snacks.

Tomatoes are a great source of vitamins

A single tomato can provide about 40% of the daily recommended minimum of vitamin C. What's more, tomatoes supply vitamin A, which supports immunity, vision, and skin health; vitamin K, which is good for your bones; and potassium, a key nutrient for heart function, muscle contractions, and maintaining a healthy blood pressure and fluid balance.

They protect heart health

Tomatoes contain an antioxidant called lycopene, which is responsible for their red color. Research suggests that in terms of heart health benefits, it's more effective to eat tomatoes and tomato products than take lycopene supplements. Other studies have shown that higher blood levels of lycopene are tied to lower death rates for people with metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors that raise the chances of developing heart disease, diabetes, and stroke.

RELATED: 29 Healthy Tomato Recipes

Improve you vision

Lycopene is also good for your eyes. And that's not the only peeper-protective nutrient in tomatoes; they contain lutein and beta-carotene as well. According to research, those nutrients support vision and protect against eye conditions including cataracts and macular degeneration.

Boost digestive health

The fluid and fiber in tomatoes may be helpful if you're prone to constipation. (According to the USDA one large tomato contains 6 ounces of fluid, and 1.5 grams of fiber.) Just be aware that in some people, the acidity from cooked tomatoes may trigger or worsen acid reflux and indigestion.

Help with diabetes management

Tomatoes may be a protective food for people with type 2 diabetes: In one study, people with diabetes who supplemented with cooked tomatoes for 30 days experienced a decrease in lipid peroxidation, a chain reaction in which substances called free radicals attack fat, leading to damage that ups the risk of heart disease. This is particularly important, because diabetes doubles the risk of stroke and heart attack.

RELATED: 6 Health Benefits of Onions

Guard skin health

A 2011 study found that the combination of tomato paste and olive oil protected against sun damage, and boosted the production of pro-collagen, a molecule that gives the skin its structure and keeps it firm and youthful. Scientists believe that the lycopene in tomatoes is key. It’s at its highest concentration when tomatoes have been cooked, and olive oil boosts its absorption from your digestive system into your bloodstream.

Protect against cancer

Observational studies have found links between the superstar compound lycopene and fewer incidences of prostate, ovarian, lung, and stomach cancers.

How to reap all the perks of tomatoes

Your can incorporate tomatoes into your diet in a number of forms—fresh, dried, or as sauce, salsa, or paste. This also allows you to enjoy tomatoes year-round.

Add fresh tomatoes to omelets and salads, and serve them sliced, drizzled with balsamic and garnished with fresh basil, sea salt, and cracked black pepper. Dress fresh greens or steamed veggies with sundried tomato pesto, or drizzle it over broiled fish. Toss spaghetti squash or beans with tomato sauce, or use it as a topping for sautéed green beans or potatoes. Add salsa to scrambled eggs or taco salad, or spoon onto cooked fish, black beans, or brown rice. Use tomato paste in veggie chili, or mix it into hummus, along with roasted garlic and harissa. Bon appétit.

Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, is Health’s contributing nutrition editor, a New York Times best-selling author, and a consultant for the New York Yankees and Brooklyn Nets.

Sours: https://www.health.com/nutrition/health-benefits-tomatoes

Tomatoes: Health Benefits & Nutrition Facts

Tomatoes are ubiquitous in the American diet. They appear in sauces, salads, juices, soups and elsewhere. Their prevalence is good news; tomatoes are healthful as well as tasty and versatile. They are especially lauded for their cardiovascular benefits.

"Tomatoes are low in calories, (about 25 calories per one medium-size tomato) yet filled with nutrition," said Heather Mangieri, a Pittsburgh-based registered dietitian and nutritionist, health author and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. They are good sources of several vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients, especially the carotenoid lycopene, which gives tomatoes their vibrant red color.

But Americans didn't always take advantage of tomatoes' goodness. Tomatoes were used as a decorative plant until the late 1800s. People thought tomatoes were poisonous, probably because they belong to the nightshade family, according to the Texas A & M University horticulture department. (Tomatoes do, in fact, contain alkaloids that can cause adverse reactions in some people.)

However, while people in North America were shunning tomatoes, indigenous peoples in South America, as well as Europeans, were chowing down. Tomatoes are native to the region of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Chile. Around the 1500s, Spanish conquistadors began shipping them around the globe.

Italians were among the first Western populations to embrace the tomato. In Italy, a tomato is a pomodoro, or golden apple, which probably refers to yellow- or orange-colored tomatoes. The French sometimes call them "love apples" — pomme d'amour, according to the George Mateljan Foundation’s World’s Healthiest Foods website.

Fruit or vegetable?

Whether a tomato is classified as a fruit or a vegetable depends on whom you ask. A botanist would tell you that a tomato is a fruit as well as a berry because it develops from a single fertilized ovary.

A chef or U.S. politician, however, might disagree. In 1886, in a tax lawsuit with a tomato importer, the Supreme Court ruled that tomatoes are vegetables, according to National Geographic. The U.S. Department of Agriculture lists tomatoes and tomato products in the vegetable group in the National Nutrient Database. But the primary reason we think of tomatoes as vegetables is their savory taste, which we associate with main meals rather than dessert or snacks. 

There are hundreds of varieties of tomatoes. They can bered, pink, yellow, orange/tangerine, green, purple, brown, or black, according to World's Healthiest Foods. Among the largest varieties are beefsteak and beef master tomatoes. Roma tomatoes are medium in size, and cherry and grape tomatoes are small. 

The term "heirloom tomatoes" has several different meanings. Traditionally, the term refers to seeds that get handed down from generation to generation within a family. But there are also "commercial heirloom" tomatoes in the marketplace, which are often produced from cross-breeding and open pollination.

Nutrient profile

"Tomatoes are high in fiber and a good source of vitamin A, C, B2 … folate and chromium," said Mangieri. The vitamins act as antioxidants, which neutralize free radicals to stop the condition of oxidative stress, according to an article in Pharmacognosy Review. Free radicals cause cell damage and disruption that can contribute to diseases. The minerals play important roles in ensuring the body functions properly. 

"There are also a variety of carotenoids [including lycopene and beta-carotene], the phytonutrients that are thought to play a role in chronic disease prevention," said Mangieri. Mangieri noted that cooking tomatoes increases the amount of lycopene you absorb.

"Tomatoes are also rich in potassium, a mineral that Americans fall short on in their diet. One medium tomato contain almost 300 mg of potassium," said Mangieri. "One cup of tomato juice contains 534 milligrams of potassium, and a half-cup of tomato sauce has 454 milligrams." Potassium is associated with heart health and proper nerve and muscle function. 

Here are the nutrition facts for tomatoes, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which regulates food labeling through the National Labeling and Education Act:

Health benefits

Heart health

Lycopene is thought to reduce the risk of heart disease, said Mangieri. A 2011 review of studies on lycopene and heart disease, published in Current Medicinal Chemistry, found that most research supports the positive relationship between lycopene intake or low-dose supplementation and reduced risk of heart disease. This is likely due to two of lycopene's actions involving fats in the bloodstream. Lycopene, and some other phytonutrients, can lower lipid peroxidation. Lipid peroxidation is when fats in the blood are damaged by oxygen and in excess can trigger gradual blocking of blood vessels (atherosclerosis). Lycopene has also been shown to result in lowered LDL (bad) cholesterol and triglyceride levels. 

Beta-carotene may help lower the risk of metabolic syndrome, at least in middle-age and elderly men, a study published in the Journal of Nutrition found. Metabolic syndrome is characterized by high blood pressure, high blood sugar, abnormal cholesterol levels and excess fat around the waist. It is often considered a precursor to heart disease and diabetes. In the study, men with the most beta-carotene intake had the lowest risk of metabolic syndrome, as well as reduced waist circumference. Scientists suspect this is the result of beta-carotene's antioxidant activities. 

Phytonutrients in tomatoes can also help reduce excessive platelet clumping, which can lead to unwanted clotting and blood vessel blockages, according to a study of 19 fruits and 26 vegetables published in Blood Coagulation Fibrinolysis. The study found tomatoes to be among the most effective foods in this regard. 

Vitamin C, too, is linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. A 2015 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition looked at more than 100,000 people and found that those who ate the most fruits and vegetables had a 15 percent lower risk of developing heart disease. Those with the highest vitamin C levels in their plasma had even more reduced rates of heart disease. Scientists theorize that vitamin C may have cardiovascular benefits because it is an antioxidant. It also may lower bad LDL cholesterol and keep arteries flexible, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

"A diet rich in potassium helps to offset some of sodium's harmful effects on blood pressure," said Mangieri. This is because potassium promotes vasodilation, or widening of the blood vessels, which decreases blood pressure. One study of 12,000 adults, published in Archives of Internal Medicine, showed that those who consumed 4,069 mg of potassium each day lowered their risk of cardiovascular disease and ischemic heart disease by 37 percent and 49 percent, respectively, compared to those who took 1,793 mg per day. 

Antioxidant power

Though most of the phytonutrients and vitamins in tomatoes have potent antioxidant properties, lycopene is a standout. In a test tube study published in Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, researchers found that lycopene was most effective at deactivating singlet oxygen (a harmful free radical) of all the carotenoids. This could be because lycopene has a unique molecule shape that is highly effective in deactivating free radicals.

Strong bones

Lycopene may promote bone health and help prevent the development of osteoporosis. A study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research found that participants with higher levels of lycopene in their blood were less likely to experience hip or nonvertebral fracture. Furthermore, a study published in Osteoporosis International found that postmenopausal women who added lycopene to their diets for four months saw decreased bone resorption (breakdown of bones).

Eyesight

Tomatoes contain both vitamin A and beta-carotene, which can turn into vitamin A when digested. Vitamin A is known to be necessary for vision. It is required to keep the retina working correctly and for low-light and color vision, according to the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. It also plays a role in eye development. 

Digestion

Mangieri noted tomatoes' high fiber content, which fills about 9 percent of your daily needs per cup. This can help promote smooth digestion, healthy stool bulk and regularity, which helps maintain colorectal health. According to the Mayo Clinic, a high-fiber diet may help reduce the risk of hemorrhoids and diverticulitis (small, painful pouches on the colon). 

Skin

Tomatoes' vitamin C and vitamin A content is good for your skin. According to the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, vitamin C is necessary for collagen production, which keeps your skin looking youthful and aids in wound healing, and vitamin A is a compound in retinoids, which are popular in anti-aging skin treatments.

Beta-carotene may help protect against sunburn, according to a meta-analysis published in Photochemistry and Photobiology. The researchers looked at several studies and found that participants who took beta-carotene supplements for 10 weeks had lower rates of sunburn. For each month of additional supplementation, the protection level increased. 

Cancer prevention

A 1999 review published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that tomatoes and lycopene were associated with reduced risk of cancers of the prostate, lung, stomach, pancreas, colon and rectum, esophagus, oral cavity, breast and cervix. The associations were strongest for prostate, lung and stomach cancers.

Much research has focused on the relationship between reduced prostate cancer risk and tomatoes. For example, a large-scale study of nearly 50,000 men published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found an inverse relationship between lycopene from tomatoes and prostate cancer risk. Men with the highest levels of lycopene were 21 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer than those with the lowest lycopene levels. 

Another study published in PloS One found that alpha-tomatine, a saponin phytonutrient in tomatoes, was associated with the death of prostate cancer cells in a laboratory setting. Alpha-tomatine was also associated with anti-growth effects in non-small cell lung cancer cells, according to a study in Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics. 

A 2015 review published in the Journal of Cancer Prevention found that lycopene lowered the risk of stomach cancer through its antioxidant actions. Researchers looked primarily at participants who smoked, suffered from chronic inflammation or had elevated levels of stomach bacteria Helicobacter pylori, though they noted that poor diet and family history could also be risk factors lessened by lycopene. 

Stroke

Lycopene may decrease stroke risk, at least in men. According to a 12-year study published in Neurology, middle-age men with the highest levels of lycopene in their blood had a 55 percent reduced rate of any kind of stroke. They had a 59 percent reduced rate of strokes from blood clots, the most common kind. 

Cognition

The beta-carotene in tomatoes may help protect against cognitive decline. A study published in JAMA found that men who took beta-carotene supplements long term — the study covered 18 years — were less likely to lose cognitive abilities. Men who took beta-carotene supplements for only one year did not see results. The authors speculate that the long-term results were the result of beta-carotene acting as an antioxidant, but could also be the result of lifestyle factors or other characteristics. More studies are needed. 

Additionally, some studies have linked diets with tomatoes to a reduced risk of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, according to World's Healthiest Foods. 

Asthma

Some small-scale studies suggest that the lycopene content in tomatoes may help asthma sufferers. One study, published in Free Radical Research,found that taking tomato extract reduced lung inflammation. Another study, published in Allergy, found that a daily dose of lycopene for a week reduced exercise-induced asthma in 55 percent of participants. Researchers suspect this was because of an antioxidant effect in the lungs. 

Nerve, muscle and cell health 

"Tomatoes are rich in potassium, a mineral that helps nerves and muscles communicate," said Mangieri. For example, potassium helps regulates your heart beat. "It helps move nutrients into cells and waste products out of cells," she added. 

Risks of eating tomatoes

Like many fruits and vegetables with edible skins, tomatoes are often covered in pesticides. Tomatoes ranked ninth on the Environmental Working Group's annual Dirty Dozen list, which compiles the fruits and vegetables with the most pesticides. Try to buy organic tomatoes if you can. 

The leaves of a tomato plant should not be eaten. They contain large concentrations of alkaloids, according to World's Healthiest Foods. 

If eaten in reasonable amounts, tomatoes should produce no serious side effects. If you eat an abundance of tomatoes daily, however, you may experience problems from having too much lycopene or potassium. Consuming more than 30 mg of lycopene daily could potentially cause nausea, diarrhea, indigestion and bloating, according to the American Cancer Society.

People with serious hyperkalemia, or too much potassium in their blood, should talk to their doctors about the appropriate amount of tomato consumption. According to the National Institutes of Health, hyperkalemia can result in irregular heartbeats and other cardiovascular problems, as well as reduced muscle control.

Enjoying tomatoes

Mangieri, a self-described tomato lover, provided some tips on incorporating more tomatoes into your diet. She said:

  • Tomatoes are definitely better fresh, but that does not mean that you can't enjoy them in the winter months. Place fresh tomatoes in zip-lock bags and freeze them for the winter. They can be used to make soups, stews and chili during the colder months. 
  • Add a layer of fresh, sliced tomatoes to lasagna. It's a great way to boost the nutrients of this dish.
  • Eat baby tomatoes with hummus or low-fat dressing.
  • Fresh tomatoes sliced with fresh mozzarella, topped with fresh basil then drizzled with olive oil.

Additional resources

Sours: https://www.livescience.com/54615-tomato-nutrition.html
  1. Cadillac cue repair
  2. Nsh.u stock
  3. Movie themed classroom decor

Tomato Nutrition Facts: What Nutrients Are in Tomatoes?

Find out top tomato nutrition facts and the nutrient content in tomatoes.

Before you leave ...

Get your free copy of "10 Must-Know Tomato Growing Tips." This 20-page guide is filled with  tips you need to know to have a successful tomato crop, whether you’re a beginning or experienced gardener. 

Tomato Nutrition Facts: #1

Tomatoes have good amounts of some basic necessary nutrients.

One medium sized-tomato provides over a third of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C, and nearly a third of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin A.

Tomatoes are also a great source of fiber, carbohydrate, potassium and iron.

Tomato Nutrition Facts: #2

Tomatoes have low amounts of potentially unhealthy nutrients. Too much fat and sodium can exacerbate many health issues for millions. Tomatoes are low in each of these nutrients.

Tomato Nutrition Facts: #3

Tomatoes have high amounts of special nutrients. Tomatoes are an outstanding source of the antioxidant lycopene, which has been shown to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Quick and fun nutrition facts

  • Tomatoes are diet-friendly: A tomato is more than 90 % water and is very low in sodium. It’s a diuretic that helps eliminate toxins while you’re on a diet.
  • Tomatoes are heart-healthy: A tomato has 0 grams of cholesterol and contains extremely small amounts of fat.
  • Tomatoes are nutrient-rich: A tomato’s vitamin C content increases as the fruit ripens. Vine-ripened tomatoes contain nearly twice the vitamin C and beta-carotene as their green-picked counterparts.

Tomato Nutrient Analysis

Serving size: this information presents nutrient amounts for 1 cup fresh, chopped tomato (approximately 1/3 pound or 1 average size tomato)

Approximate serving size equivalents:
8-10 cherry tomatoes
2-3 small tomatoes
1/8 cup tomato paste
8 ounces canned tomatoes (1 cup)
½ cup tomato juice

Calorie information

NutrientAmount% DV
Total calories32.42%
From carbohydrate25.5n/a
From fat3.0n/a
From protein4.4n/a

Carbohydrates

NutrientAmount% DV
Total carbohydrates7.1 grams2%
Dietary fiber2.2 gramsn/a
Starch0.0 gramsn/a
Sugars4.7 gramsn/a

Fats

NutrientAmount% DV
Total fat0.4 grams1%
Saturated fat0.1 gramsn/a
Monosaturated fat0.1 gramsn/a
Polyunsaturated fat0.1 gramsn/a
Total omega-3 fatty acids5.4 mgn/a
Total omega-6 fatty acids144 mgn/a

Vitamins

NutrientAmount% DV
Vitamin A1499 IU30%
Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)0.1 mg4%
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)0.01 mg2%
Vitamin B3 (Niacin)1.1 mg5%
Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)0.2 mg2%
Vitamin B60.1 mg7%
Folate27.0 mcg7%
Vitamin C22.9 mg38%
Vitamin E1.0 mg5%
Vitamin K14.2 mcg18%

Minerals

NutrientAmount% DV
Calcium18.0 mg2%
Chromium9.00 mcg7.5%
Copper0.1 mg5%
Iron.5 mg3%
Magnesium19.8 mg5%
Manganese0.2 mg10%
Phosphorus43.2 mg4%
Potassium427 mg12%
Sodium9.0 mg0%
Zinc0.3 mg2%

Sterols

NutrientAmount% DV
Cholesterol0.0 grams0%
Phytosterols12.6 mgn/a

Other nutrients

NutrientAmount% DV
Water170 gramsn/a
Protein1.6 grams3%

Source: Nutrient data for this listing was provided by USDA

Percent Daily Values (% DV) are for adults or children aged 4 or older, and are based on a 2,000 calorie reference diet. Individual daily values may be higher or lower based on personal needs.

More tomato fun

Best tomato nutrition facts – how to eat tomatoes for health ...

What are the health benefits of tomatoes?

Tomato: fruit or vegetable? Find out ... 

Tomato costume: make or buy one ...

Take The Great Tomato Quiz ...

Tomato facts: fun information and trivia ... 

More about tomatoes on our Pinterest board ...

Return from Tomato Nutrition Facts: What Nutrients Are in Tomatoes to Tomato Dirt home

As an Amazon Associate and Rakuten Advertising affiliate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Sours: http://www.tomatodirt.com/tomato-nutrition-facts.html
Tomatoes Are AMAZING \u0026 Why You Should Eat Them 🍅

Tomato Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Have you ever wondered if a tomato is a fruit or a vegetable? Botanists classify tomatoes as fruit because they develop from the ovary of flowering plants and contain seeds. However, because tomatoes are prepared and served as vegetables, they're generally thought of as a vegetable from a culinary perspective.

Either way, tomatoes are a delicious and nutritious food that makes a good addition to most healthy eating plans. Tomatoes contain several nutrients and compounds important for health, such as vitamin C, lycopene, potassium, and vitamin K, among others.

Tomato Nutrition Facts

One small (2 2/5" in diameter) tomato (91g) provides 16 calories, 0.8g of protein, 3.5g of carbohydrates, and 0.2g of fat. Tomatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C, fiber, and vitamin K. The following nutrition information is provided by the USDA.

  • Calories: 16
  • Fat:0.2g
  • Sodium:5mg
  • Carbohydrates:3.5g
  • Fiber:1.1g
  • Sugars:2.4g
  • Protein: 0.8g
  • Vitamin C: 12.5mg
  • Vitamin K: 7.2mcg

Carbs

A small tomato (91g) contains 3.5 grams of carbs. Of the carbohydrates, 2.4 grams are from naturally occurring sugars, and 1.1 grams come from fiber. Tomatoes are considered a low glycemic index food.

Fats

Like most fruits and vegetables, tomatoes contain very little fat.

Protein

There is just under 1 gram of protein in a small, fresh tomato.

Vitamins and Minerals

Tomatoes are a great source of potassium and vitamin C. Several beneficial forms of vitamin A are also present in tomatoes, including lutein, zeaxanthin, and lycopene.

Calories

One small tomato (91g) provides 16 calories, 73% of which come from carbs, 18% from protein, and 9% from fat.

Summary

Tomatoes are a low-calorie, low-fat hydrating fruit with a low glycemic index. Tomatoes are high in vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium.

Health Benefits

Tomatoes offer several health benefits related to their phytonutrient content.

May Reduce Risk of Prostate Cancer

Lycopene is an antioxidant in tomatoes that has been associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. Lycopene acts on various biochemical pathways that help prevent cancer cells from developing and spreading. Lycopene is higher in processed tomato foods (such as ketchup or canned tomatoes) because the processing involves removing water and leaving a more concentrated tomato product.

How Carotenoids Give Plants Their Color

Supports Heart Health

The lycopene in tomatoes works synergistically with other antioxidant vitamins (like vitamins A, E, and C) to provide compounding benefits for heart health. Some studies demonstrate a relationship between the lycopene in tomatoes and an oxidized LDL and arterial plaque reduction. Tomatoes also contain potassium, which is well-known to reduce blood pressure.

Aids Eyesight

Tomatoes are an excellent source of vitamin A, and more specifically, tutein and zeaxanthin. These two forms of vitamin A accumulate in the retina and prevent age-related macular degeneration. Consuming tomatoes as a part of dishes that include some fat (such as in a salad with olive oil) improves absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins, which are crucial for good eyesight.

Protects Against Sun Damage

The phytonutrients in tomatoes are protective against some of the effects of UVB damage. Although tomatoes alone aren't enough to prevent skin cancer, including tomatoes in your meal plan may improve your body's resilience to the dangers of certain types of sun rays.

16 Foods That Are Good for Your Skin

May Reduce Risk of Diabetes Complications

Tomatoes have been associated with antihyperglycemic effects in rodents but not in humans. Nonetheless, tomatoes are still beneficial for people with diabetes. Tomatoes have been shown to reduce the oxidative stress that's caused by diabetes. They also reduce inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, and tissue damage, all common complications of the disease.

Allergies

If you have seasonal allergies to grass pollen, you may experience an oral allergy after eating tomatoes. Symptoms may include itchy mouth, ears, or throat or swelling of the lips, mouth, tongue, and throat. Talk to your doctor if you suspect you may be allergic to tomatoes.

Adverse Effects

Tomatoes are naturally acidic. If you suffer from acid reflux or heartburn, you may want to limit your intake of tomatoes and tomato products.

Varieties

There are hundreds of varieties of tomatoes. Tomatoes are available in many shapes (from tiny spheres to large ovals), colors (from green to red, yellow, and orange), and sizes (from small cherry tomatoes to large beefsteak tomatoes).

The level of sweetness and acidity vary depending on the growing conditions and ripeness at harvest. Some tomatoes have few seeds, such as the plum, whereas others have many.

In addition to fresh tomatoes, you can find canned tomatoes diced, crushed, or puréed, which often have additional ingredients like sodium. There are also a variety of tomato products like tomato paste (which is concentrated, cooked tomatoes), tomato juice (which is sold on its own or as part of vegetable juice blends), and sundried tomatoes (may be sold on their own or packed in oil).

Many condiments use tomato as a base, such as ketchup and salsa. When purchasing commercial tomato sauces, always read the label. Some brands of jarred tomato sauce contain lots of added sugar and sodium. Making your own with fresh or canned tomatoes is a good way to avoid these added ingredients.

When It's Best

Look for fresh tomatoes that are plump and firm with smooth, shiny skin. The color should be uniform. Avoid tomatoes with cuts, bruises, soft spots, or mold. Local tomatoes from the farmer's market are best during the summer season.

Storage and Food Safety

Contrary to popular belief, you should not store fresh tomatoes in the refrigerator. This can turn the flesh mealy and reduce the flavor—instead, store tomatoes in a cool, dry place.

Wash fresh tomatoes well before cutting into them. Once tomatoes are cut, store them in the refrigerator and use within a few days. Dishes with cooked tomatoes should be refrigerated and consumed within a week.

How to Prepare

Tomatoes are often used in salads, soups, dips, sauces, and casseroles. You can enjoy tomatoes raw or cooked.

To cook tomatoes, consider sautéing, grilling, or roasting. Roasting yields a juicy, concentrated flavor and texture. To roast, season tomatoes with olive oil, garlic, red pepper, and other herbs and spices. You can eat roasted tomatoes plain or puree them for a tomato sauce or as a topper for grilled, baked, or roasted meat, chicken, or fish.

You can also use tomatoes to make a simple marinara sauce or use tomato sauce and tomato products to flavor foods such as spaghetti squash, chili, and stews. Season your sauce however you'd like, using basil, oregano, parsley, or garlic. Large tomatoes can also be stuffed with meat and rice for a hearty dish.

Recipes

Healthy Tomato Recipes to Try

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Tomatoes, red, ripe, raw, year round average. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  2. Chen P, Zhang W, Wang X, et al. Lycopene and risk of prostate cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Medicine (Baltimore). 2015;94(33):e1260. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000001260

  3. Story EN, Kopec RE, Schwartz SJ, Harris GK. An update on the health effects of tomato lycopene. Annu Rev Food Sci Technol. 2010;1:189-210. doi:10.1146/annurev.food.102308.124120

  4. Mozos I, Stoian D, Caraba A, Malainer C, Horbańczuk JO, Atanasov AG. Lycopene and vascular health. Front Pharmacol. 2018;9:521. doi:10.3389/fphar.2018.00521

  5. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Potassium: Fact sheet for health professionals. Updated March 26, 2021.

  6. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Vitamin A: Fact sheet for health professionals. Updated March 26, 2021.

  7. Groten K, Marini A, Grether-Beck S, et al. Tomato phytonutrients balance UV response: Results from a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2019;32(2):101-108. doi:10.1159/000497104

  8. Saleem A. Banihani (2018) Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and type 2 diabetes. Int J Food Prop. 2018;21(1):99-105. doi:10.1080/10942912.2018.1439959

  9. Oral allergy syndrome. American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Updated 2019.

  10. Diet and gastroesophageal reflux disease. American Society For Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Updated 2014.

  11. Tomato. University of Illinois Extension. Watch Your Garden Grow. Updated 2020.

Sours: https://www.verywellfit.com/tomatoes-nutrition-facts-calories-and-health-benefits-4119981

Facts tomato nutrition

.

The Tomato Effect

.

You will also like:

.



586 587 588 589 590